Poem – Familiarity

(image by Girts Gailans, Copyright Red Edge / Girts Gailans – click to see more)

Sometimes I can sit in our back room, maybe have some music on, and imagine some new stories, or write some new poems. One recent afternoon a bunch of poems came out, some better than this one. I will post some of those soon. That isn’t a good appetiser for reading this one though is it? Well I can tell you this about it. Some parts inspiration came from this months (bi-monthly) “Poetry” magazine. More on that publication on the weekend post. It isn’t a long one, so should not take up more than another 30 seconds of your time. I chose it first because it loosely fits in with the olympics, although it is not about the olympics itself. That might put you off if you are all Olympic-d out and sick of water polo (what is NBC’s obsession with showing that?), but ought not to as it is linked to the Olympics in the loosest sense. So enjoy, laugh at, think it is crap, or whatever, but either way, here it is:

Familiarity

You were like an old shoe
once worn all the time
now stored in the cupboard

stenched, stale, and over familiar
beauty drenched in cynicism
time has been and gone

till one day I noticed
as I walked clouded summer streets
character is just a point of view

you may be crooked or quirky
but still have a secret
till I pull back the curtain and see

oh to grin and bear it
why, when I can wear it?
do travel those streets again

where many stories etched
but build a new verse still
even a small mark makes a difference

it made me laugh
seeing new from my old eyes
discover what makes a fool

take you out
one more cute trip
old Blighty, I love you

Lexicon word of the day: proselytise.

Advertisements

24 comments on “Poem – Familiarity

  1. Smaktakula says:

    Are you proselytizing for Dear Old Blighty? Such actions in the long run can only prove invidious.

    • Elliot says:

      It kind of wrks like this. In the US, to most people, if you insult the US without being super polite, e.g. American food is rubbish, there will likely be arms in the air. There will be responses like “Well why is yours so great?” or “Well why do you eat it? or “Why do you come here?”. In most instances if you said the same thing to a Brit e.g. English food is sh*t, you would get one reaction. A nod of the head and “I know”. Tis the custom to agree, and not get upset about it, in a way more humerous to agree.

      So to cut a long response a bit shorter, if we get a chance to be proud about something which in the context of above, isn’t too often, then we need to take it!

      • Smaktakula says:

        Hey, I agree–I was just trying to use two of your daily words in a sentence.

        But it IS funny that you brought up cuisine….

      • Elliot says:

        To show where my head is this morning I read the first of those words and thought that word looked familiar, what does it mean again? Oh yeah it is my lexicon word…

        Actually to add to the prior comment, baiting some Americans into getting mildly excited and defensive is a good party game (and easy sport) easily deflated with humour when they insult back, and I just agree with them.

        Oh and American AND British food is generally a bit sh*t. Thankfully we can both eat Italian, Indian, Greek, etc, etc, and now claim it as our own.

      • Smaktakula says:

        WHAT? How dare you besmirch our star-spangled palates! I’ll have you know that my ancestors fought and bled for those freedom fries! And that’s why we celebrate by drowning them in catsup!

      • Elliot says:

        Don’t forget those techniques in grinding beef, and cooking it on an open grill.

  2. Aww! That seems to be the way a lot of ex-pats feel right now.

  3. “beauty drenched in cynicism” – great line πŸ™‚

    • Elliot says:

      Thanks – Hey Sheila, you are back, I shall head on over and check out your latest post πŸ™‚

      • Yes, I took a vacation, intending to blog while I was there and my internet connection went nuts on me! And then I lagged getting back into the groove of things but I’m back in the swing of things and ready for anything! (I think) πŸ™‚

  4. Carrie Rubin says:

    No laughing here–just admiration. Don’t know how you poetry writers do it. Has never been a skill I possessed. And I’m okay with that. I’ll just enjoy the work of others. πŸ™‚

    • Elliot says:

      Carrie you’re building my part up here πŸ™‚

      I had never tried any of this prior to a few months back. Not to put too fine a point on it, but I just choose a subject, or I have a line, and then bang some words out around it, then see what happens. Erm, I don’t think I quite have the romance of poetry yet. Or maybe I am getting there. It is all learning for me.

      Anyhoo, glad you liked it.

  5. jmmcdowell says:

    Never a Smiths or Morrissey fan, so that’s almost enough to make me want to watch the Olympics. ;

    I think poetry’s an excellent writing exercise, even if I never master it (and it’s unlikely I will). Especially the forms that limit the meter and number of words.

    • Elliot says:

      I mainly do it for the writing exercise. Going back some months I originally did a post on how me and poetry didn’t get on, I was no fan. So the next thing was to challenge that, and try do some. That led to the Haiku and the longer stuff. Now I have a healthy respect for it, and quite enjoy it in small doses, so it has been good all round.

      Oh – I do love the Smiths, and a lot of Morrissey’s solo stuff, but his recent comments seem to be him losing the plot a bit.

  6. Mark says:

    This is very wistful, and I like the flow.

    But is it really about a shoe? I wonder…I’m sure Ole Blighty loves you too! Just out of interest, did you get a traffic spike when you mentioned the Olympics? Mine did.

    • Elliot says:

      Well living abroad and visiting from time to time, it usually starts with me seeing Blighty as a bit tired and grey. Over the next few days more of the beauty starts to appear. But of course not everything is perfect. So it is good for some of the good things e.g. the olympics, to remind me to feel proud from time to time.

      I didn’t really notice a spike. You might have it more. After being freshly pressed and taking in a lot of views, your site likely ranks a lot higher than mine in equivalent google searches. Well that is my excuse!

      • Mark says:

        Yes, I’ve been a little bit cynical with my Olympic posts! Quite surprised to see my blog on page one of google. I know what you mean about the UK looking a bit grey, but it has it’s charm even if the weather is all over the place. But when the sun shines it’s like a makeover…

      • Elliot says:

        I think living in California does not help me on that front. It is sunny most of the time here so the uk does look grey in comparison. My wife and I actually look forward to the days when there is rain.

  7. Parting with an old worn out shoe has always been difficult. We fitted so well together for so long and there is a sense of betrayal when they are discarded. I have much less of a problem ditching people in many cases.

  8. Eric Alagan says:

    Shoes on my feet – many miles we walked in companionship – with each step, a little of you rubbed off, a little of me left behind. Now I see the etchings under foot, patterns of my life lived.

    The above words sprung to mind as I read this post of yours…Cheers, Eric

feed the brain:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s