Random Use List – 1

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mellifluousadjective (of a sound) pleasingly smooth and musical to hear: e.g. her low mellifluous voice.

Derivatives:

  • mellifluously – adverb,
  • mellifluousness – noun.
Comments: I like the sound of this word so I guess you might say it is mellifluous. Not to be confused with melliferous which means “yielding or producing honey”, so is similar in spelling and of one contextual meaning.

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agglomerate:  verb, collect or form into a mass or group: [ with obj. ] : he is seeking to agglomerate the functions of the Home Office | [ no obj. ] : these small particles soon agglomerate together.   —   noun, a mass or collection of things: a multimedia agglomerate.

Derivatives:

  • agglomerative – adjective

Comments: I just liked the sound of this one. The words of this Lexicon will soon agglomerate, where of course I shall continue to apologise for bad puns.

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impuissant: adjective literary, unable to take effective action; powerless.

Derivatives:

  • impuissance – noun

Comments: I like the three syllable sound.

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hubris: mass noun, excessive pride or self-confidence.

Derivatives:

  • hubristic – adjective

Comments: This word doesn’t get used often enough (by me).

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consternation: mass noun, a feeling of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected: to her consternation, her car wouldn’t start.

Comments: It just fits in with the daily post. To Reginald’s consternation, Cletus would just not go back to sleep.

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heterodox: adjective, not conforming with accepted or orthodox standards or beliefs: heterodox views.

Derivatives:

  • heterodoxy – noun

Comments: I didn’t know what this one meant, but when I looked it up, I liked the meaning.

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vituperate: verb [ with obj. ] archaicblame or insult (someone) in strong or violent language. vituperative – adjective, bitter and abusive: a vituperative outburst.

Derivatives:

  • vituperator  – noun

Comments: I was in a hurry to look up a word and this one caught my attention.

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mountebank: noun, a person who deceives others, especially in order to trick them out of their money; a charlatan.

  • historical a person who sold patent medicines in public places.

Derivatives:

  • mountebankery – noun

Comments: The origin of the word was interesting to me – ORIGIN: late 16th cent.: from Italian montambanco, from the imperative phrasemonta in banco! ‘climb on the bench!’ (with allusion to the raised platform used to attract an audience).

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obfuscate: verb [ with obj. ] make obscure, unclear, or unintelligible: the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins. bewilder (someone): the new rule is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them.

Derivatives:

  • obfuscation – noun
  • obfuscatory – adjective

Comments: I read this in something yesterday. It was a word I had forgotten about.

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lollygag:

  • verb ( lollygags, lollygagging, lollygagged ) [ no obj. ]  informal, spend time aimlessly; idle: she goes to Arizona every January to lollygag in the sun.
  • [ with adverbial of direction ] dawdle: we’re lollygagging along.

Comments: Didn’t know this one.

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paralogism : noun, Logica piece of illogical or fallacious reasoning, especially one which appears superficially logical or which the reasoner believes to be logical.

Derivatives:

  • paralogist – noun

Comments: Liked the meaning of this one, it seemed relevant (for reasons I won’t go into here).

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niggardly:

  • adjective,  ungenerous with money, time, etc.; mean: Madame’s niggardly nature.• meagre and given grudgingly: niggardly allowances from the Treasury.
  • adverb archaicin a mean or meagre manner.

Derivatives:

  • niggardliness-  noun

Origin:

  • mid 16th cent.: from niggard + ly. Usage: The word niggardly has no connection with the highly offensive term nigger, but because of the similarity of sound and its negative meaning of ‘mean, ungenerous’ many people are uncomfortable with using it for fear of causing offence, and in the US it is now widely avoided.

Comments: Never heard of this one, and wondered what it meant. I suspected it was connected to the offensive word, which it isn’t but I can see why it’s usage has all but disappeared.

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mendacious:adjective,  not telling the truth; lying: mendacious propaganda.

Derivatives:

  • mendaciously – adverb

Comments: It sounded contrary to my blog post of the day.

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magniloquent: adjective, using high-flown or bombastic language.

Derivatives:

  • magniloquently – adverb

Comments: I needed this word the other day!

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virago: noun ( pl. viragos or viragoes )a domineering, violent, or bad-tempered woman.• archaic a woman of masculine strength or spirit; a female warrior.

Comments: nothing much to add, just noted this one whilst browsing.

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perspicacious: adjective,  having a ready insight into and understanding of things: it offers quite a few facts to the perspicacious reporter.

Derivatives:

  • perspicaciously  – adverb

Comments: Slightly relevant to todays post. “As regards Twitter, he was somewhat perspicacious”.

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adroit: adjective,  clever or skilful: he was adroit at tax avoidance.

Derivatives:

  • adroitly – adverb

Comments: A word I knew but rarely used, so this is a kind of reminder that it is there.

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gaucherie : noun [ mass noun ]awkward or unsophisticated ways: I was ridiculed for my sartorial gaucherie | [ count noun ] : she had long since got over gaucheries such as blushing.

Comments: I like the sound of this word.

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circumlocution: noun [ mass noun ]the use of many words where fewer would do, especially in a deliberate attempt to be vague or evasive: his admission came after years of circumlocution | [ count noun ]: he used a number of poetic circumlocutions.

Comments: The blog in general. Probably.

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deleveraging: noun [ mass noun ] Finance, the process or practice of reducing the level of one’s debt by rapidly selling one’sassets.

Derivatives:

  • deleverage – noun & verb

Comments:  Nothing much to say about this – Sorry!

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polyethnic: adjective belonging to, comprising, or containing many ethnic groups.

Derivatives:

  • polyethnicity – noun

Comments: Most modern european football teams.

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tautology :noun ( pl. tautologies ) [ mass noun ]the saying of the same thing twice over in different words, generally considered to be a fault of style (e.g. they arrived one after the other in succession, or the red rose is red).• [ count noun ] a phrase or expression in which the same thing is said twice in different words.• Logic a statement that is true by necessity or by virtue of its logical form.

Derivatives:

  • tautological – adjective,
  • tautologically – adverb,
  • tautologist – noun,
  • tautologize – (also tautologise )verb,
  • tautologous – adjective

Comments: This word reminds me of university a lot.

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osculate : verb [ with obj. ] 1) Mathematics (of a curve or surface) touch (another curve or surface) so as to have a common tangent at the point of contact. 2) formal or humorous kiss.

Derivatives:

  • osculant – adjective,
  • osculation – noun,
  • osculatory – adjective

Comments: What blog writers do?

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pertinacious: adjective formal, holding firmly to an opinion or a course of action: he worked with a pertinacious resistance to interruptions.

Derivatives:

  • pertinaciously – adverb,
  • pertinaciousness – noun,
  • pertinacity – noun

Comments: none.

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querulous: adjective, complaining in a rather petulant or whining manner: she became querulous and demanding.

Derivatives:

  • querulously – adverb,
  • querulousness – noun

Comments: I was somewhat querulous about my blog going somewhere, or something such.

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perdurable: adjective formal ,enduring continuously; imperishable.

Derivatives:

  • perdurability -noun,
  • perdurably adverb

Comments: Haiku?

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timorous: adjective showing or suffering from nervousness or a lack of confidence: a timorous voice.

Derivatives:

  • timorously – adverb,
  • timorousness – noun

Comments: I thought this meant something else!

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circumlocution: noun [ mass noun ]the use of many words where fewer would do, especially in a deliberate attempt to be vague or evasive: his admission came after years of circumlocution | [ count noun ]: he used a number of poetic circumlocutions.

Comments: Sometimes, often, maybe, occasionally, then or now, the blog.

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perturbation: 1) [ mass noun ] anxiety; mental uneasiness: she sensed her friend’s perturbation.• [ count noun ] a cause of anxiety or uneasiness: Frank’s atheism was more than a perturbation to Michael. 2) a deviation of a system, moving object, or process from its regular or normal state or path, caused by an outside influence.• Astronomy a minor deviation in the course of a celestial body, caused by the attraction of a neighbouring body.

Comments: That Monday feeling.

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variegated: adjective,  exhibiting different colours, especially as irregular patches or streaks: variegated yellow bricks.• Botany (of a plant or foliage) having or consisting of leaves that are edged orpatterned in a second colour, especially white as well as green.• marked by variety: his variegated and amusing observations.

Derivatives:

  • variegate – verb,
  • variegation – noun

Comments: not much to say on this one, sorry!

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rattletrap: noun informalan old or rickety vehicle.

Comments: I liked the sound of the word.

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insouciant: adjectiveshowing a casual lack of concern: an insouciant shrug.

Derivatives:

  • insouciantly – adverb

Comments: I wasn’t familiar with this one.

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coquette: noun, 1) a flirtatious woman. 2) a crested Central and South American hummingbird, typically with green plumage, a reddish crest, and elongated cheek feathers.●

Lophornis and two other genera, family Trochilidae: several species.

Comments: Just an interesting word. Note the origin: mid 17th cent.: French, feminine of coquet ‘wanton’, diminutive of coq‘cock’.

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flummery: noun ( pl. flummeries ) [ mass noun ] 1 )meaningless or insincere flattery or conventions: she hated the flummery of public relations. 2) a sweet dish made with beaten eggs, sugar, and flavourings.

 Comments: Just an interesting word.
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addlepated: (also addleheaded, addlebrained) adjective, lacking in common sense; having a muddled mind: he made the addlebrained decisionto install an uncertain rookie at point guard.
Comments: It seemed to fit the days blog post.
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inosculate : verb [ no obj. ] formal, join by intertwining or fitting closely together.
Derivatives:
  • inosculation – noun

Comments: Just a word I found. And that’s it.

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verbose: adjective, using or expressed in more words than are needed: much academic language is obscure and verbose.

Derivatives:

  • verbosely – adverb

Comments: This was pointed out as something I do on this blog. Partially this is due to the blog being a first draft nature, but it is a fair point I feel.

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mettlesome: adjective literary(of a person or animal) full of spirit and courage; lively: their horses were beasts of burden, not mettlesome chargers.

Comments: Just a word I found interesting.

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athwart : preposition, 1) from side to side of; across: a counter was placed athwart the entrance. 2) in opposition to; counter to: these statistics run sharply athwart conventional presumptions.

adverb, 1) across from side to side; transversely: one table running athwart was all the room would hold. 2) so as to be perverse or contradictory: our words ran athwart and we ended up at cross purposes.

Comments: Just I word that I wondered what it meant.

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boggle: verb [ no obj. ] informal(of a person or their mind) be astonished or baffled when trying to imagine something: the mind boggles at the spectacle.• [ with obj. ] cause (a person or their mind) to be astonished: the inflated salary of a star boggles the mind.• (boggle at) (of a person) hesitate to do or accept: you never boggle at plain speaking.

Comments: I knew of “the mind boggles” but I found the other meanings interesting.

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venerate: verb [ with obj. ]regard with great respect; revere: Philip of Beverley was venerated as a saint.

Derivatives:

  • venerator – noun

Comments: A word I do not use too often.

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inhere: verb [ no obj. ] (inhere in/within) formal exist essentially or permanently in: the potential for change that inheres within the adult education world.• Law (of rights, powers, etc.) be vested in a person or group or attached to the ownership of a property. See also inhering.

Comments: A forgotten about word.

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punctilious : adjective, showing great attention to detail or correct behaviour: he was punctilious in providing every amenity for his guests.

Derivatives:

  • punctiliously – adverb,
  • punctiliousness – noun

Comments: Just a word I noticed somewhere.

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tohubohu: noun, N. Amer. informala state of chaos; utter confusion: a fearful tohubohu.

Comments: Doesn’t the word just sound great?

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provost: noun, 1) Brit.the head of certain university colleges, especially at Oxford or Cambridge, and public schools.• N. Amer.a senior administrative officer in certain universities. 2) Scottish term for mayor. See also Lord Provost. 3) the head of a chapter in a cathedral.• the Protestant minister of the principal church of a town or district in Germany and certain other European countries.• historical the head of a Christian community. 4) short for provost marshal. 5) historical the chief magistrate of a French or other European town.

Derivatives:

  • provostship – noun

Comments: Just a word I noticed.

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exiguous: adjective,  formal, very small in size or amount: my exiguous musical resources.

Derivatives:

  • exiguity – noun
Comments: My lexicon (once was)?
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foretoken: verb [ with obj. ] literary, be a sign of (a future event): a shiver in the night air foretokening December.
Comments: I liked the definition.
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erratum: noun, an error in printing or writing.• (errata) a list of corrected errors appended to a book or published in a subsequent issue of a journal.
Comments: just a word I found.
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penurious: adjective,  formal 1) extremely poor; poverty-stricken: a penurious old tramp.• characterized by poverty: penurious years. 2) unwilling to spend money; mean: his stingy and penurious wife.
Derivatives:
  • penuriously – adverb,
  • penuriousness – noun

Comments: none.

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sanguinary: adjective,  chiefly archaicinvolving or causing much bloodshed.

Comments: I thought it meant something else.

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pseudo-cleft: (also pseudo-cleft sentence )noun, Grammar – a sentence which resembles a cleft sentence by conveying emphasis or politeness through the use of a relative clause, such as what we want is money representingwe want money .

Comments: Ok I know this is grammar, but an interesting revision none the less.

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kowtow: verb [ no obj. ] 1) act in an excessively subservient manner: she didn’t have to kowtow to a boss. 2) historical kneel and touch the ground with the forehead in worship or submission as part of Chinese custom. – noun, historicalan act of kowtowing as part of Chinese custom.

Derivatives:

  • kowtower – noun

Comments: A word I had forgotten about.

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perfidious:adjective literary, deceitful and untrustworthy: a perfidious lover.

Derivatives:

  • perfidiously – adverb,
  • perfidiousness – noun

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vainglory: noun [ mass noun ] literary, inordinate pride in oneself or one’s achievements; excessive vanity.

Derivatives:

  • vainglorious – adjective,
  • vaingloriously – adverb,
  • vaingloriousness – noun

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valetudinarian: noun, a person who is unduly anxious about their health.• a person suffering from poor health. adjectives – howing undue concern about one’s health.• suffering from poor health.

Derivatives:

  • valetudinarianism – noun
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obdurate: adjective, stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action: I argued this point with him, but he was obdurate.
Derivatives:
  • obduracy – noun,
  • obdurately – adverb,
  • obdurateness – noun

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interstice: noun (usu. interstices) an intervening space, especially a very small one: sunshine filtered through the interstices of the arching trees.

Comments: this one felt like monday morning.

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ingress: noun 1) [ mass noun ] the action or fact of going in or entering; the capacity or right of entrance.• a place or means of access; an entrance.• [ mass noun ] the unwanted introduction of water, foreign bodies, contaminants, etc. 2) Astronomy & Astrology the arrival of the sun, moon, or a planet in a specified constellation or part of the sky.• the beginning of a transit.

Derivatives:

  • ingression – noun

Comments: I liked the second meaning.

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inviolate: adjective, free or safe from injury or violation: an international memorial which must remain inviolate.

Derivatives:

  • inviolacy – noun,
  • inviolately – adverb

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inveigle: verb [ with obj. and adverbial ] persuade (someone) to do something by means of deception or flattery: he inveigled her back to his room.• (inveigle oneself or one’s way into) gain entrance to (a place) by using deception or flattery: Jones had inveigled himself into her house.

Derivatives:

  • inveiglement – noun

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opprobrious: adjective, (of language) expressing scorn or criticism.

Derivatives:

  • opprobriously – adverb

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consentient: adjective,  archaicof the same opinion in a matter; in agreement.

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epigene: adjective, Geology taking place or produced on the surface of the earth.

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imbroglio: noun ( pl. imbroglios )an extremely confused, complicated, or embarrassing situation: the abdication imbroglio of 1936.• archaic a confused heap.

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